Desert Paint

I know many of you have been waiting patiently for the next installment of the Mother Road – Route 66. Here’s a little preview of what’s coming next.

This is a scene I photographed in the Painted Desert area of Petrified Forest National Park.

As I said in my last post, I took so many photographs through the Petrified Forest National Park and other nearby areas that it is just taking me longer than I thought to go through them all and put together a meaningful presentation of my trip.

Imagine for just a moment standing in a place that today is a hot, dry desert where just finding enough water to survive is a tremendous challenge. Now, you just travelled back in time on the same spot to the Triassic Period, 225 million years ago! The desert is gone; it has been replaced with a lush tropical forest teaming with life. Huge trees – some as big as redwoods – are everywhere. Rivers and lakes surround you. There are crocodile like reptiles the size of dinosaurs. The rivers and lakes flood frequently, swamping the trees and other vegetation and creatures.

Petrified logs from the Triassic Period

Now you have a much better understanding of what lies beneath your feet in this hot, barren desert landscape. This is the landscape of Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona. Now you know why this installment is taking awhile. Thanks for being patient; the next post is coming along.

Thank for visiting my blog page. Stay safe and enjoy the outdoors!

4 thoughts on “Desert Paint

  1. Truly a fascinating geographic region, and reminds of the vastness of geologic time which is is hard for us humans to fathom.

    On Wed, Jul 28, 2021, 4:16 PM Tim’s Viewpoints & Visuals wrote:

    > Tim Harlow posted: ” I know many of you have been waiting patiently for > the next installment of the Mother Road – Route 66. Here’s a little preview > of what’s coming next. This is a scene I photographed in the Painted Desert > area of Petrified Forest National Park. As I” >

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ben! You are absolutely right on. Fathoming continental drift is difficult on its own just because of the immense amount of time. But then standing in a hot, scorched Southwestern desert trying to picture it as a lush tropical jungle is next to crazy. Thanks for reading my blog, Ben. Many happy travels to you all.

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